#NaNoWriMo2018 Day 5: “Dominoes Fall” by Dario Marianelli

Remember, remember, the fifth of November, the gunpowder, treason and plot.

The first time I heard that little poem was in the film V for Vendetta (I read the graphic novel later, don’t worry). That’s why today felt like a good time to share this piece of the film’s score by Dario Marianelli:

To borrow from Stephon on Saturday Night Live, this track has everything: plenty of build up, a locomotive tempo, a sense of urgency. That’s probably why I use it often when writing confession scenes that turn into action sequences.

Also, in the spirit of tomorrow’s U.S. elections, let me leave you with this V for Vendetta reminder:

“People shouldn’t be afraid of their government. Government should be afraid of their people.”

Remember, remember, to vote in November.

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#NaNoWriMo2017 Day 25: “Coward”

 

I found myself self writing a villain’s monologue to this piece while sitting in a dark room last night, which seems appropriate given what happens during this part of Christopher Nolan’s “Insterstellar.” The Mozart-influenced piece builds as the drama does:

“She’s like a mouse in a maze. She knows where the center is, but she also knows that the bigger rat following her is more interested in keeping her from the prize than earning it for himself. So she runs along a small patch, hoping that it’s enough to keep him at bay while also close enough for her to make her move given the chance. If he — I — ever give her a chance, that is.”

#NaNoWriMo2017 Day 1: “Exit Music (For a Film)”

It’s Nov. 1, which means it’s time to cannonball into a 50,000 word-deep project over the next 30 days. Because I’ll be focusing on one of my projects, I’m not sure how much time I’ll have to continue ignoring this blog — but in the spirit of constant creation this month, I’m pledging to post a tiny snippet of original writing or a “writespiration” post at least every other day. We’ll hope for better.

So without further ado, your writespiration to enter the month is “Exit Music (For a Film),” originally by Radiohead but adapted by Ramin Djawadi for the Westworld soundtrack.

The morose melody in the beginning. The searing strings toward the end. The inclusion of the Westworld opening theme. This is a perfect tune for action as it escalates and comes to a slamming halt, just like the finale of the show’s first season.